New Part-time Employee

I need some help working on Seoulistic.com. So I posted on the sites I mentioned in my previous post. I am not offering much as this is coming out of my own pocket, so I went with a student as my first employee.

I love Korean student employees. The younger they are the better (chill, I’m not a creep! just read on). When I was working at KoreanClass101, my first part-time employee was Minkyung. At the time she was a 20 year old college student just looking to make some spending money. It wasn’t a lot of money, but she appreciated it. And she was really sincere and hardworking.

That was in Japan. Now I’m in Korea, andย minimum wage in Korea is about 4,600 won an hour. So I know any Korean student would jump at the chance to do easy research work from home for what I’m offering, 8๋งŒ์› a month (about 70USD). They’ll appreciate anything that doesn’t require serving food in a McDonald’s uniform.

So I picked this 19-year old kid with no job experience at all. When she replied to my ad, she had no resume and said she had no work experience (not exactly the best way to get a job!). When I met her, she seemed lost and it seemed fairly obvious that she had never applied for a job before. But that’s the exact reason I chose her. I know she’ll do what I ask without complaints. She already seems to be hardworking and sincere. And as long as I’m fair to her, I’m sure she’ll keep doing this until she’s got something better going on.

I would like to build my entire team with these college kids. But I mean, that’s not really sustainable nor very smart. But for the time being, these kids are perfect for what I need!

Script Excerpt for Future Video

I haven’t enjoyed working in a long time. Of course there are good days where I have fun moments, but I haven’t actually enjoyedย work in a while. The last time I did enjoy work was when I first starting working for KoreanClass101 (not so much later). The reason I enjoyed it is because I was given creative freedom, and I was learning on the job. Much more enjoyable than teaching the nuances between “the” and “a” (which is really hard btw!).

So working on Seoulistic.com (my new website – not yet up) is an experience that I am enjoying, especially that part about being creative again. I am currently working on scripts for some videos to teach basic Korean. And I find myself giggling at home alone 2AM in the morning, and I think it would only be fair to share my delight ๐Ÿ™‚

Here’s an excerpt from a video script teaching “How to Say ‘Thank You’ in Korean.” You can go the really boring route and just say it in the video, maybe repeat it a few times and have a basic review. It accomplishes what the video is aiming for, but the stickiness and social networking share value is virtually nil. That’s why I like to add a bit of comedy to my work.

[Scene 3] – ๊ฐ์‚ฌํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค (Thank you)
Guy on toilet. Fart sounds. Guy struggles to pop one out.
Looks for toilet paper and sees only one sheet.ย Knocks on next stall.
Guy: ์ €๊ธฐ์š”~ ์ข€ ๋„์™€์ฃผ์„ธ์š”. (Excuse me, a little help please)
– Roll of toilet paper is tossed over the stall.
Guy: ๊ฐ์‚ฌํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค… (Thank you)
Simple enough and it teaches the word in a fairly humorous situation. But I wanted to add a repeat scene so the educational value sticks for the viewer.
[Scene 4] – ๊ฐ์‚ฌํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค (Thank you)

Guy on toilet. Fart sounds. Guy struggles to pop one out.
Looks for toilet paper and sees only one sheet.ย Knocks on next stall.
Guy: ์ €๊ธฐ์š”~ ์ข€ ๋„์™€์ฃผ์„ธ์š”. (Excuse me, a little help please)
Dirty sock is thrown over.
Guy: (confused look) ๊ฐ์‚ฌํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค…? (Thank you?)
And there it is folks. My contribution to the Korean-learning community. I couldn’t stop laughing at this, and hopefully the world thinks it’s funny too. But even if they don’t, I’m still going to enjoy it ๐Ÿ™‚

Might As Well Take Over the World While I’m At It

I recently just quit after working 3 years at KoreanClass101.com, and InnovativeLanguage.com. It was a great experience to learn, which I did a lot of, but towards the end, there was not much learning involved, and more of “just do what you’re told” (which I’ve never been really good at anyway).

So I left New York and came to Korea to work at Webactually.co.kr. I figured a start-up Internet marketing agency would be right up my alley. But instead of doing any marketing, all I did was translations of e-mails the boss wanted to send. Not very stimulating if you ask me. Plus, it seems like my 3 years of prior start-up experience around the web was about 3 years more experience they had.

So my buddy Howard hooked me up with a job at his English Academy. They’re giving some pretty decent pay, with work hours starting from 4PM – 10PM, which I love, but also hate at the same time. I love that I can work on anything I want to before 4PM, but getting home at 11:30 PM is proving to be quite a challenge.

I’ve always said I wanted to do my own thing, produce my own content, and possibly even make an effort to monetize that content. I didn’t know what I wanted to do, and to be honest, I still only have a vague idea. I would still need money for hosting and domain, so I’m waiting till my next paycheck. But when I get it, hosting and domain will be right after a bottle of bubbly, cigar, and possibly gold grillz on my list of things to get.

Until then peeps. Please be kind ๐Ÿ™‚