Job sites for Korea – Still a Pain

In my last post I mentioned I was looking to hire Korean natives through craigslist and networking. That didn’t work out too well. I was going to go through the streets and start posting some fliers, but before I could do that I met with a friend who told me about some more online resources for hiring Koreans.

She said that Naver.com and Daum.net both have cafes that are useful for hiring.

Here are the job sites she posted on:
http://cafe.daum.net/breakjob
http://cafe.daum.net/4toeic/

These are exactly what I was looking for: free job postings to a site with tons of people looking for jobs. No stupid Korean business registration number, no fee to pay. Just post and let the applications flood in.

But it’s still not that simple for foreigners, mostly because we’re not used to the whole online “cafe” system. These are essentially online forums with added levels of difficulty. Korean internet is a royal pain in the ass. Here’s a typical example of Korean cafes:

Me -> I want to post so I go to the site.
Site -> Says I must sign up.
Me -> Ok cool. I’m in. I press “write post.”
Site -> Says I must upgrade to a “regular member” to write posts.
Me -> Why? Fine,  how do I do it?
Site -> Request the admin to be upgraded.
Me ->  WTF why??? Fine. Done. Request made. Press “write post” again.
Site -> Your request must be approved by an administrator.
Me -> AHH whatever… fine. I’ll wait.
Site -> (next day). Congratulations, you have been upgraded!
Me -> Finally! Press “write post” again.
Site ->  You must write 5 comments in order to post.
Me -> …. I hate you…

To Koreans it’s normal protocol on the internet. To me, it’s like having an argument with my mom: I don’t understand half the things she says and I never win.

I didn’t even try this time. I asked my friend to post for me, and within 1 hour, I already have about 10 applications. I’m loving that I found these sites. But it still doesn’t change the fact that I freaking hate the Internet in Korea.

Trying to be Scrappy

So as readers of this blog may know, I’m working on a tip site for Korea (seoulistic.com). Check it out if you want, but currently it’s still in development, so there’s not much to look at yet :P

As this is an endeavor that I am going about on my own, I have to be scrappy. I don’t have any seed money, just a few grand that I saved up. So funds are extremely limited, and I have to find ways to get some resources. Currently I’m looking for 2 people. As mentioned previously, I’m looking for an attractive girl for some youtube videos. I’m also looking for someone to help me with quality control. I’m not offering much money, so hiring some help is a challenge. Here’s my approach:

The Internet

Of course I tried the holy grail of human resources, craigslist. I am looking for a native-Korean speaker, and that’s probably why the response was very limited. Craigslist is great for foreigners, but Korean users are next to nil.

Obviously, I would like to post on alba.co.kr (the go-to source for part-time jobs in Korea). That would be the real “craigslist of Korea.” But I am not yet incorporated. And just like any other Korean site, in order to register you need a registration number, in this case a business registration number. But there’s probably a fee that I don’t want to pay anyway.

I’ve also downloaded a few dating apps to see if any internet peeps wanna get up on this, but I’ve gotten lukewarm responses so far. Most of the girls on these apps are looking for flirtatious chatting encounters, and I’m not much of a flirt (damn!). I can’t even run some game for a date. How am I going to run enough game to get up on the internet and ask a girl if she wants to record a “video” for some money? (Creepy!)

Network

My network is extremely small and limited considering I am moving onto my fourth year in Korea. I’m a homebody, so I don’t get to meet too many people. The people that I do meet are mostly from work, so the people I know are pretty much a bunch of Korean-american guys (from my last job).

Networks are indispensable for any business endeavor, and I haven’t really built mine up yet. But I’ll have to see if anyone around them wants to become the next apple girl.

The Next Step

I’m not giving up though. Next on the to-do list is creating a flyer and posting around universities around Seoul. I believe the price is about 30,000원 for you to post for 1 month. That’s too rich for my blood. If you’re careful enough to escape those half-watching building ajeoshis (경비아저씨), you can just do the garage sale route and post on lampposts galore. That’s what I’m going with. It’s old school, but I’m optimistic it will work.